Growing Trees in Eastern Ontario and West Quebec

For those looking to plant a tree or many trees, we recommend planting native species for their role in establishing a heathy ecosystem.  They grow in cooperation with other plants to provide food and habitat for wildlife and insects that sustain the food chain.

Different species have different growth habits and requirements; for example, some species are less ideal for typical urban lots.  Our provincial tree, the Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus) is ill-suited for the city, quickly outgrowing its allotted space and intolerant to salt and pollution.

Below we provide a list of native trees suitable for growing in Eastern Ontario and West Quebec.  A brief summary identifies their main characteristics, needs, and suitability for different growing conditions and sites.  We also provide some links for further information about growing each tree.  Information about these links is provided under Resources.

Species need to be hardy and suitable for our area.  Changes in climate – temperature swings, hotter summers, milder winters, longer growing seasons – mean that some species typical in Eastern Ontario and West Quebec may struggle under new conditions.  Boreal species such as White Spruce and Black Spruce may not tolerate hot, dry summers.  Some projections show White Pine extirpated south of Ottawa before the end of the century.  On the hand, it may be possible to grow native species typically found in southern Ontario; e.g. some of the hardier Carolinian forest trees.  These borderline hardy species have been identified in our descriptions below.  Given the speed of change, some trees will need a helping hand in moving northward as they cannot naturally disseminate quickly enough.  What’s important is maintaining the biodiversity of our woodlands and landscapes with hardy native species as the mix shifts north.

PLANTING INFORMATION RESOURCES

Ontario Tree Atlas – A provincial government web site, the Ontario Tree Atlas provides rudimentary planting tips for native trees and shrubs in our region.

Morton Arboretum – The famous Morton Arboretum near Chicago, Illinois is a world-leading centre for tree science.  Their web site has excellent information about trees and their growing requirements.  While northern Illinois is roughly one zone warmer than our area (USDA Zone 5, which is Canada Zone 6) and consists of prairie grasslands and oak savanna, we share many of the same native hardy species.  Most of the information on their site is still valid for these species in our region.

Quick Links to Tree Families

Pines
Hemlock
Spruces
Fir
Tamarack
Cypress
Nut Trees
Oaks
Beech
Maples
Birches and Birch Family
Sycamore

CONIFERS

Pines

Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus) – A very large, fast growing evergreen tree, somewhat sensitive to urban conditions.  Tolerant of many growing conditions.  Common near Ottawa as a wild and planted tree. Famous as a timber tree; it is our official provincial tree species.  The tallest White Pine in Ontario grows in Gillies Grove in Arnprior.
Suitable for:  rural and large suburban lots away from the road.
Prefers:  full sun and acidic soils, but will tolerate alkaline soils.
Intolerant of:  salt and pollution
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/eastern-white-pine
https://www.ontario.ca/page/eastern-white-pine
Ontario Extension Note: http://www.lrconline.com/Extension_Notes_English/pdf/wht_pn.pdf

Jack Pine (Pinus banksiana) – A medium sized evergreen tree.  An iconic northern species specializing in growing on poor soils, but will grow successfully on good soils. Crown usually narrow. Uncommon near Ottawa as a wild tree, fairly common as a planted tree.
Suitable for:  urban, suburban, and rural lots.
Prefers:  full sun and sandy, acidic soil, but will tolerate alkaline soils.
Intolerant of:  poor drainage.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/jack-pine
https://www.ontario.ca/page/jack-pine

Red Pine (Pinus resinosa) – A large evergreen tree, usually becoming tall and relatively narrow with an open crown, somewhat sensitive to urban conditions.  Uncommon near Ottawa as a wild tree, but common as a plantation conifer often for telephone poles.
Suitable for:  rural properties.
Prefers:  full sun and sandy, acidic soil, but will tolerate alkaline soils.
Intolerant of:  salt and pollution.
References: https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/red-pine
https://www.ontario.ca/page/red-pine

Pitch Pine (Pinus rigida) – A medium-sized evergreen tree that grows in the southern range of our region. It specializes in growing on thin, sandy soils, rock barrens, and even boggy wetland margins, but will grow successfully on good soil. Crown often broad.  Rare in Eastern Ontario, growing near Brockville, Gananoque, and Charleston Lake, rarely planted to date, but likely hardy in the Ottawa area.
Suitable for:  suburban and rural properties .
Prefers:  full sun and sandy, acidic soil, but will tolerate alkaline soils.
References: https://www.ontario.ca/page/pitch-pine

Hemlock

Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) – A large evergreen tree, very shade tolerant, slow growing, and long-lived, sensitive to urban conditions.  Feathery foliage contrasts with reddish-brown or purple-brown bark.  Common near Ottawa in older forests, uncommonly planted.  An invasive insect Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, which is established to our south, poses a long term threat to this species.  Deer browse heavily on hemlock and may also be affecting its ability to propagate naturally.
Suitable for:  large suburban lots and rural properties with damp and/or shady areas.
Prefers:  moist, cool sites.
Intolerant of:  drought.
References: https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/eastern-hemlock
https://www.ontario.ca/page/eastern-hemlock
Ontario Extension Note: http://www.lrconline.com/Extension_Notes_English/pdf/hmlck.pdf

Spruces

White Spruce (Picea glauca) – A large evergreen tree, common on higher pH substrates, somewhat sensitive to urban conditions.  Grows rapidly.  Common around Ottawa in forests and often planted on front lawns and as wind breaks.  A boreal species, it may have difficulties in the long term with hotter/drier summers; stress is shown by low branch die-off.
Suitable for:  rural and large suburban lots.
Prefers:  a wide range of conditions.
Intolerant of:  salt and drought.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/white-spruce
https://www.ontario.ca/page/white-spruce
Ontario Extension Note:  http://www.lrconline.com/Extension_Notes_English/pdf/wht_sprce.pdf

Red Spruce (Picea rubens) – A large, long-lived evergreen tree, very shade tolerant, of mesic acidic climax forests.  Generally rare near Ottawa, but locally common in appropriate habitat in Ottawa’s southeastern greenbelt and parts of west Quebec. It should be more widely planted for its attractive, dense, shiny yellowish-green foliage.
Suitable for:  rural and large suburban lots.
Prefers:  cool, moist habitats and acid soils, but can tolerate alkalinity.
Intolerant of:  salt and drought.
References:  https://www.ontario.ca/page/red-spruce

Black Spruce (Picea mariana) – A hardy, narrow, medium sized evergreen tree, characteristic of boreal wetlands, but also growing on uplands.  Slow growing and relative short-lived.  Uncommon near Ottawa except for bogs and fens in which it can be a dominant tree; rarely used as a landscape tree.  Shade tolerant.
Suitable for:  rural lots particularly those with wet areas.
Prefers:  a wide range of soil types and moisture levels.
Intolerant of:  Heat – this is a boreal species.
References:  https://www.ontario.ca/page/black-spruce

Fir

Balsam Fir (Abies balsamea) – A narrow, medium-sized evergreen tree, typical of mature forests, somewhat shade tolerant and sensitive to urban conditions.  Common near Ottawa in forests, uncommonly planted.  Foliage has a pleasant, balsam scent.  A boreal species, it may have difficulty in the longer term with hotter/drier summers.
Suitable for:  rural and large suburban lots.
Prefers:  acid soil and moisture, but will tolerate a wide range of soil types.
Intolerant of:  Heat – this is a boreal species.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/balsam-fir
https://www.ontario.ca/page/balsam-fir

Tamarack (Larch)

Tamarack (Larix laricina) – A medium sized deciduous conifer (it loses its needles in the fall), a specialist of wetland soils but can also grow on drier soils.  Fairly common near Ottawa as a wild tree, commonly planted.  Makes a good specimen tree due to its attractive foliage and bright yellow fall colour.
Suitable for:  rural and large suburban lots.
Prefers:  full sun; can grow in a variety of soils.
Intolerant of:  heat and drought.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/tamarack
https://www.ontario.ca/page/tamarack

Cypress

Eastern White Cedar (Thuja occidentalis) – A medium-sized, slow growing tree, partially shade tolerant, well known as our most common hedge species, but it can become a large forest tree if given a few centuries; very long-lived.  Common near Ottawa and commonly planted; can be kept shrub-size if pruned.  It’s a preferred food source by deer so protection is required where they roam.
Suitable for:  urban, suburban, and rural lots.
Prefers:  alkaline, moist soils, but tolerant of other types.
Intolerant of:  road salt.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/eastern-arborvitae
https://www.ontario.ca/page/eastern-white-cedar
Ontario Extension Note: http://www.lrconline.com/Extension_Notes_English/pdf/cdr.pdf

Eastern Redcedar (Juniperus virginiana) – A small to medium-sized, slow growing tree, typical of open and high pH conditions.  It’s a cold hardy, but southern tree tolerant of hot/dry summers and poor soils.  Uncommon near Ottawa, but common just south of here; uncommonly planted. Tolerant of road salt. It is a host for cedar apple rust and should not be planted near apple orchards.
Suitable for:  urban, suburban, and rural lots.
Prefers:  alkaline soils, but tolerant of other types.
Intolerant of:  shade and poor drainage.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/eastern-red-cedar
https://www.ontario.ca/page/eastern-redcedar

DECIDUOUS TREES

Nut Trees

Black Walnut (Juglans nigra) – A very large tree, typical of bottomlands, but adaptable.  Native to parts of southern eastern Ontario, but very commonly planted and naturalized (by squirrels).  Produces a chemical, juglone, that inhibits the growth of nearby plants so site this tree carefully.  Some trees and shrubs are tolerant of juglone (see plant list in the Ontario Tree Atlas reference). Makes a lovely specimen tree.  Large edible nuts can be both a blessing and a curse, although the squirrels will take most of them away.
Suitable for:  rural and large suburban lots.
Prefers:  full sun, moist, rich soils, but tolerant of other types.
Intolerant of:  shade and acid soils.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/black-walnut
https://www.ontario.ca/environment-and-energy/tree-atlas/ontario-southeast

Butternut (Juglans cinerea) – Also called White Walnut. A large tree, typical of higher pH forests with an open spreading crown.  Common as a wild tree, uncommonly planted.  Large edible nuts can be both a blessing and a curse, although the squirrels will take most of them away.  Famously afflicted with the invasive disease Butternut Canker, which kills most trees, but leaves others relatively unscathed.
Suitable for:  rural and large suburban lots, but not recommended until resistant trees are widely available.  Those with suitable rural properties in Eastern Ontario should consider growing trees from the Butternut Recovery Program.
Prefers:  full sun, alkaline soils.
Intolerant of:  shade and acid soils.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/butternut-not-recommended
https://www.ontario.ca/page/butternut
Ontario Extension Note:  http://www.lrconline.com/Extension_Notes_English/pdf/bttrnt.pdf

Bitternut Hickory (Carya cordiformis) – A large, graceful tree with upright growth habit, hardy, and adaptable.  Typical of mature forests; common as a wild tree near Ottawa, but rarely planted.  Small, bitter-tasting nuts.  Sometimes afflicted with phomopsis galls in crown, otherwise trouble free.  Clear yellow fall foliage. Should be more widely planted in parks and residences.
Suitable for:  rural, suburban, and large urban lots.
Prefers:  rich soil and full sun, but will tolerate partial shade.
Intolerant of:  poor drainage.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/bitternut-hickory
https://www.ontario.ca/page/bitternut-hickory

Shagbark Hickory (Carya ovata) – A large tree, long-lived with strong wood and interesting shaggy bark when older.  Rare as a wild tree near Ottawa (common south), uncommonly planted.  Large, sweet, edible nuts. Reliably hardy and adaptable species tolerant of hotter/drier summers.  Should be more widely planted.  Good specimen tree.
Suitable for:  rural and suburban lots.
Prefers:  rich soil and full sun, but will tolerate partial shade and some drought.
Intolerant of:  poor drainage, although will tolerate temporary and occasional flooding.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/shagbark-hickory
https://www.ontario.ca/page/shagbark-hickory

Pignut Hickory (Carya glabra) – A narrow-crowned medium sized to large tree.  A Carolinian Forest tree, it’s rare in Eastern Ontario with a few populations near Kingston; very rarely planted.  Possibly borderline hardy in the Ottawa area in sheltered areas.  Nuts edible, but bitter.  Drought tolerant; may be a good introduction to our area for dealing with hotter/drier summers.
Suitable for:  rural and suburban lots.
Prefers:  rich soil and full sun, but will tolerate partial shade and some drought.
Intolerant of:  poor drainage.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/pignut-hickory
https://www.uoguelph.ca/arboretum/thingstosee/trees/pignuthickory

Shellbark Hickory (Carya laciniosa) – A large, narrow-crowned tree, currently not found in Eastern Ontario, but possibly hardy south towards Kingston.  (Shagbark Hickory is more reliably hardy in our area, but prefers different growing conditions.) Nuts are sweet and edible.  Bark shaggy like Shagbark Hickory.  Prefers moist conditions along bottom lands and rivers.
Suitable for:  rural lots with moist areas; growing this would be an experiment in E. Ontario.
Prefers:  moisture and full sun.
Intolerant of:  drought.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/shellbark-hickory
https://www.uoguelph.ca/arboretum/thingstosee/trees/balsamfirshellbarkhickory

Oaks

White Oak (Quercus alba) – A large, slow-growing, long-lived iconic tree, well known for its attractive pale bark, pink early season leaves, and stunning wine-red autumn foliage; typical on uplands.  Sweet, edible acorns.  Rare near Ottawa as a wild tree (common south) and uncommonly planted.  Drought tolerant. Should be more widely planted in our area in parks and as specimen trees.  Plant this tree for future generations.
Suitable for:  large suburban and rural lots.
Prefers:  full sun.
Intolerant of:  poor drainage and shade.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/white-oak
https://www.ontario.ca/page/white-oak

Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa) – A large tree, adaptable to a variety of soil and moisture conditions, but characteristic of alkaline bottomlands, although also drought tolerant once established.  Tolerant of urban stressors and generally long-lived.  Common in eastern Ontario and commonly planted. Drab fall foliage.
Suitable for:  large suburban and rural lots.
Prefers:  full sun.
Intolerant of:  deep shade.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/bur-oak
https://www.ontario.ca/page/bur-oak

Red Oak (Quercus rubra) – A large tree species, relatively fast growing, characteristic of acidic upland and Canadian Shield soils, but adaptable.  Tolerant of urban conditions. Common near Ottawa as a wild tree, commonly planted. Bright wine-red fall foliage.
Suitable for:  large suburban and rural lots.
Prefers:  full sun.
Intolerant of:  deep shade.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/northern-red-oak
https://www.ontario.ca/page/red-oak
Ontario Extension Note: http://www.lrconline.com/Extension_Notes_English/pdf/rd_oak.pdf

Swamp White Oak (Quercus bicolor) – A large tree, characteristic of rich bottomlands.  A striking tree with attractive bark and foliage, dark green on top and light green below. Edible acorns. Rare in Eastern Ontario, naturally present along the St. Lawrence; in recent years becoming more commonly planted.  Tolerant of many soil types, including moist and compacted soils.
Suitable for:  suburban and rural lots.
Prefers:  full sun and moist, well-drained soil.
Intolerant of:  drought.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/swamp-white-oak
https://www.ontario.ca/page/swamp-white-oak

Chinkapin or Chinquapin Oak (Quercus muehlenbergii) – A medium sized tree, characteristic of alkaline uplands.  A Carolinian Forest tree that grows naturally in southern eastern Ontario, very rarely planted.  Small, edible acorns.  Drought tolerant; may be a good introduction to our area to deal with hotter/drier summers.  Can also handle clay and alkaline soils typical of the Ottawa area.  A smaller alternative to Bur Oak, but may not be hardy in unsheltered areas and in the northern part of our region.
Suitable for:  urban, suburban and rural lots.
Prefers:  full sun.
Intolerant of:  poor drainage and shade.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/chinkapin-oak

Beech

American Beech (Fagus grandifolia) – An elegant, attractive large forest tree with smooth, grey bark even when mature, somewhat shade tolerant, slow growing, but long-lived.  Golden yellow fall foliage.  Small, edible “beech nuts” are eaten by birds and mammals. Common near Ottawa as a wild tree, uncommonly planted.  Unfortunately, the local population has become increasingly infected by the invasive Beech Bark Disease, which has killed a significant percentage of mature Beech in recent years.  An excellent shade and specimen tree, but not recommended for planting until resistant trees are available.
Suitable for:  rural and large suburban lots.
Prefers:  mildly acidic soils, but tolerant of others.
Intolerant of:  salt spray.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/american-beech
https://www.ontario.ca/page/american-beech

Maples

Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum) – A large tree of upland mesic conditions, shade tolerant ,and the most common source of maple syrup. Beautiful autumn colours, but sensitive to urban conditions.  Common as a wild tree and commonly planted as a shade and specimen tree.
Suitable for:  rural and large suburban lots.
Prefers:  moist, well-drained soil.
Intolerant of: pollution, drought, and salt spray.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/sugar-maple
https://www.ontario.ca/page/sugar-maple

Black Maple (Acer nigrum) – Similar to Sugar Maple, but more characteristic of bottomlands and floodplains.  Hardier to heat/drought and urban conditions than Sugar Maple and in this sense may see increased use in the future.  Uncommon as a wild tree near Ottawa, uncommonly planted to date.
Suitable for:  rural and large suburban lots.
Prefers: moist, well-drained soil.
Intolerant of:  salt spray.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/black-maple

Red Maple (Acer rubrum) – A large tree, typical of acidic, swampy conditions, but adaptable and hardy with regards to moisture and pH.  Common as a wild tree and commonly planted. Broad root spread.  Will tend to multiple stems unless pruned. Excellent fall foliage.
Suitable for:  rural and large suburban lots.
Prefers: moist, well-drained soil.
Intolerant of:  drought and salt spray.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/red-maple
https://www.ontario.ca/page/red-maple

Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum) – A large tree, typical of higher pH floodplains and riverbanks.  Fast growing, sometimes outgrowing its allotted space in cities, well known for being susceptible to losing branches in storms.  Tolerant of a wide range of conditions. Broad root spread. Fairly common as a wild tree and commonly planted due to it rapid growth.
Suitable for:  rural and large suburban lots.
Prefers: moist, well-drained soil and wet soil; full sun but tolerates partial shade.
Intolerant of:  n/a.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/silver-maple
https://www.ontario.ca/page/silver-maple

Striped Maple (Acer pensylvanicum) – A small to (rarely) almost medium-sized tree of understories in cool rich woods.  Very shade tolerant; interesting large leaves and attractive green/white striped bark.  Fairly common as a wild tree and sometimes planted.  It’s a preferred food source by deer so protection is required where they roam.
Suitable for:  urban, suburban and rural lots with a shady location.
Prefers: moist,rich soil and cool shaded conditions.
Intolerant of:  full sun and drought.
References:  https://www.ontario.ca/page/striped-maple

Mountain Maple (Acer spicatum) – A small understory tree, similar to Striped Maple in some ways but less showy.  Shade tolerant tree of cool moist woods. Fairly common as a wild tree and rarely planted.
Suitable for:  urban, suburban and rural lots with a shady location.
Prefers: moist,rich soil and cool shaded conditions.
Intolerant of:  full sun and drought.
References:  https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/tree/mountain-maple

Boxelder/Manitoba Maple (Acer negundo) – A medium-sized, rapidly growing tree with a spreading growth form, rarely growing vertically even if it has space to do so.  Often multi-stemmed, resprouting from cut limbs and trunks.  Soft, brittle wood known for breaking easily.  A host for boxelder bugs.  Although identified as an “invasive” species, it is native to Ontario, hardy and very adaptable to almost any kind of condition found in cities and suburbs.  Common as a wild tree, it spreads aggressively due to its prolific seeds, which provide food for mammals and birds.
Suitable for:  rural lots with moist areas.
Prefers: moist or even wet soils, but will tolerate dry sites.
Intolerant of:  not much.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/boxelder
https://www.ontario.ca/page/manitoba-maple

Birches and Birch Family

Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera) – A medium-sized tree of younger forests, famous for striking white bark.  Tolerant of a wide range of growing conditions. Common as a wild tree and sometimes planted.  It is short-lived and often weakened in urban conditions.
Suitable for:  suburban and rural lots.
Prefers: sunny, open conditions.
Intolerant of:  shade.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/paper-birch
https://www.ontario.ca/page/white-birch

Gray Birch (Betula populifolia) – A small pioneer tree, with whitish bark duller than that of Paper Birch.  Often grows in a clump. Short-lived, usually 50 years. Tolerates a variety of conditions including poor soil. Uncommon near Ottawa and sometimes planted.
Suitable for:  urban, suburban and rural lots.
Prefers: sunny, open conditions.
Intolerant of:  shade.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/gray-birch
https://www.ontario.ca/page/gray-birch

Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis) – A large forest species with attractive bronze bark and yellow fall foliage.  Found in mature forests, tolerant of shade and of bottomland soils.  Slow growing; can live more than 100 years.  Common near Ottawa as a wild species, uncommonly planted.
Suitable for:  urban, suburban and rural lots.
Prefers: moist, rich soil.
Intolerant of:  drought.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/yellow-birch
https://www.ontario.ca/page/yellow-birch

American Hornbeam/Blue Beech/Musclewood (Carpinus caroliniana) – A small, slow-growing tree typical of higher pH bottomlands; an understory, shade tolerant species.  Strong wood and relatively disease free.  Delicate twig structure contrasts with smooth, blue-grey fluted bark and good orange fall foliage.  Common near Ottawa, rarely planted, but should be considered for small yards where moisture is reliable.
Suitable for:  urban, suburban and rural lots.
Prefers: moist, rich soil and shade or partial shade.
Intolerant of:  drought.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/american-hornbeam
https://www.ontario.ca/page/blue-beech

Hop Hornbeam/Ironwood (Ostrya virginiana) – A small to medium-sized tree typical of higher pH uplands in the understory.  May be an “ideal” size for urban plantings of limited space.  Famously strong wood and relatively disease free; moderately drought tolerant.  Grows rapidly in full sun and rich soil.  Dull brown fall foliage, but attractive hop-like fruit.  Common near Ottawa, uncommonly planted.
Suitable for:  urban, suburban and rural lots.
Prefers: many different conditions.
Intolerant of:  poor drainage.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/ironwood
https://www.ontario.ca/page/ironwood

Sycamore

American Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) – A very large, wide-spreading tree of bottomland soils and floodplains.  A southern species suitable for large spaces with attractive white/grey mottled bark.  Present as a wild tree only in southwestern part of Eastern Ontario.  Rarely planted in the Ottawa area, but examples at the Dominion Arboretum and in Almonte have flourished.  Worth trying for areas with seasonal flooding. Smells faintly similar to Balsam Poplar. Large seed balls.
Suitable for:  rural and large suburban lots.
Prefers: moisture.
Intolerant of:  drought.
References:  https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/sycamore
https://www.ontario.ca/page/sycamore


More coming . . .